Essays

I have tried to make the essay an art form. The essay is essential in “Public Theology,” that is, theology that aims to speak in accessible language to the church — the whole people of God (and, at least occasionally, to those beyond the church who are interested in who and how and why we are. But, more than merely accessible, these essays seek to be eloquent as well, believing that insight can be alluring in its expression.

Lots of work still to do here! But this is a start …

 

2009

When Charity becomes the weapon — (November 2009) an essay reflecting on the threat made by the Catholic Church in its most recent installment of “culture wars.”

The heart of the reformation — (November 2009) an essay claiming the Reformation tradition for welcome (in light of last August’s ELCA Churchwide Assembly). 

The Body of Christ, both Whole and Wounded — (October 2009) a sermon preached for the Lake Country (Duluth, Minn. area) chapter of Lutherans Concerned.

Marshaling our Joy — (October 2009) an essay about the importance of joy in our work for justice.

And there are others knocking at the door — (August 2009) an essay reflecting on the outcome of Churchwide for the fall Wingspan newsletter.

The Goodsoil Blogs — (August 2009) a week-long series of blog entries written at the 2009 ELCA Churchwide Assembly (where the Lutheran church voted ever so timidly to allow for the blessing of same-gender relationships and the ordination of persons in such relationships).

Toward a Christian Sexual Ethics with Room for All of Us — (April/May 2009) written as a pair of monthly columns for QView Northwest, here I explore some principles for sexual ethics.

“Since when did you become such an … advocate?” — (January 2009) a creative telling of my journey as an Ally.

2001

Why Pacifists can Oppose Even This War — (October 2001) a defense of pacifism in the age of terrorism.

1999

A hell of a question — an essay in which I consider how I feel (and think) about hell.

Of liturgy and little ones — an essay exploring the “joys” of worshipping with a rambunctious saint in the pew.

Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s